Category Archives: General

The Next Episode Approaches—Honest!

Some of you asked about the next episode in the Pacer Saga. Was all set to have it up last week, but …

A good friend from India arrived, giving me the honor of shepherding him to speaking engagements and meetings. He observed, “Everything is so clean.” And after some driving, “Everything is so orderly.” Then after more driving on country roads with 4-way stops at the intersections, “Everyone is so patient here.”

We drove into mountains for his first ever taste of snow. He’d seen it on the Himalayas from miles away, but never had it fall on him, nor even touched it. Took care of that. read more ...

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Promises, Plans, and Pride

Airport terminal before dawn

Airport terminals before dawn provide only a short transition to the crowds

PROMISE

It was time to fulfill the second half of my promise. I successfully delivered the Bonanza to Vicksburg, MS. Next was an airline flight to Cleveland, OH to pick up a Piper Pacer and fly it back to Nampa, ID.

In predawn dark, five of us wrapped in private, half-awake thoughts loaded into the hotel airport shuttle. Our world extended only as far as headlights reached. A mobile world, winding on dark, tree lined roads and empty freeway ramps. The terminal entered our small orb with a wash of light. Welcome as the next journey step, but a disagreeable intruder none the less. read more ...

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Just the Two of Us

Beechcraft BE35 Bonanza

Beechcraft BE35 Bonanza

Flying mixes two of life’s apparent opposites—tech and art. And this week I get to indulge in both.

For the last two days, tech challenged. MAF asked me to deliver a rocket. The donated Beechcraft BE35 Bonanza, scooted along nicely. During the 9-hour flight from Nampa, ID to its new owner in Vicksburg, MS I routinely experienced ground speeds over 210mph. Equipped with way more computing power than NASA possessed going to the Moon, and a solid auto-pilot, I pointed the airplane in the right direction, leveled off at the correct altitude, then sat back and monitored systems. Look outside for other traffic. Look at the ground to confirm the GPS and moving map display tell the truth. Check flight instruments for the right heading and altitude. Switch fuel tanks every 30 minutes to balance the load in the wings. Scan the gages to ensure the engine and its systems still play nicely. Repeat. read more ...

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